Wednesday, December 13, 2006

Check Mate

Day 13 of the opposition's sit in has passed and still no change is sight, especially now that Amr Moussa is in charge. Has Amr Moussa ever been successful at anything?
In my humble opinion, well maybe not so humble, the opposition demands are just not enough. While I'm not to quick to adopt the "One Million" figure, even though Fisk dropped the "Two Million" bomb, it is quite clear that at least an equal number of people took to the streets to protest Siniora as did to protest 30 years of brotherly/sisterly oppression. So according to the people, which in democracies...OK ...OK... I know Democracy is sooo last year, this year is all about Moderation; But still the people are at least as as angry at this government as they were with Ghazi Kanaan's and that is a quite telling fact regardless of what deals are being tailored around the actual demands of the people.

Now I'm not a moderate, at least not by this year's definition of the word, I'm clearly an extremist as I see the opposition's demand as too lame and well ... moderate. People did not march in hundreds of thousands for a national unity government with the same old faces, they marched for change. They want to move forward, or backward that's debatable, but to move regardless. With that said, I do understand the opposition's walking on eggs approach. There are too many scary scenarios, sectarian strife being possibly the least scary of them, that must be averted. The fragility of the situation in Lebanon has pushed them towards the "moderate" to avoid the heinous distinction of "democratic" which is a shame because they do have a strong and rightful case that they are fumbling away.

On the other hand, which would be the no shame hand, Siniora continues to burry his head in sand and xanax while counting on his friend and Fatfat to bail him out. I must stop and wonder about Fatfat for a second. This summer while he was the acting Minister of Interior our National Basketball team had a very respectable showing at the World Championship including a win against France, now that he has reassumed his role as Sports and Youth Minister we lose 4 straight games at the Asian Games including a loss against none other than Borat's home team; must be the Marjeyoun Zone Defense. Off course, Siniora does have another option. He can actually choose to listen to his people but that would set a bad precedent for the region.

As many regional implications as this movement might have, make no mistake that these people who took to the streets are for the most part a bunch of genuinely disgruntled citizens. No one should take them lightly or dismiss them as mere pawns as some of the kings, bishops, and rooks are doing.

Tis the Season to be Jolly...

10 comments:

Firas said...

It sounds more like a stalemate than a checkmate, mate.

Jamal said...

touche mate

Anonymous said...

Ok frankly Jamal I am not certain that the majority of those rallying for March 8th were ever part of March 14th demonstrations, which set the bar in any case. That implies that many of those not on the streets could be in support of the government so it is a draw.Also many did come out in support of the government at the memorial for Pierre Gemayell, as well as in other shows of support.

At best it seems Lebanon is divided,and 1 mill or 2 mill can not enforce their will on the rest of the nation without some repurcussions.Also what with having the war this summer to unexpectedly deal with,Hezbollah to placate as part of the government,lingering effects of Syria's rule as well as contnued meddling,not to mention it not having been quite 2 yrs is it really fair to critique them on not having accomplished that much given the circumstances.

Would love to see what you would do Jamal in similar circumstances but you are lucky you are not in leadership.Would still have to say that those presently are still mainly shiia by far,and when you add that there are some who are probably Syrians as well as palestinians and to some degree other Lebanese.I don't think these demonstration's are an accurate way to gauge what is going on in Lebanon.So yes stalemate it is.

Anonymous said...

"He can actually choose to listen to his people but that would set a bad precedent for the region"

Right on it!!!

Moubarak and the likes of him are especially not happy.

Anonymous said...

GPJ == Good Post Jamal...
the new acronym I will leave you from now on.
I am a geeky and I am lazy :P, deal with it.

Ana Min Beirut said...

"Marjeyoun Zone Defense" !!!!!!!!!!! I just love you ya man ... brotherly that is :P

The Dreamer said...

its true that the majority of the demonstrators want complete change, not just some national unity government compromise. the whole political system is intrinsically flawed and needs to be changed. but to achieve that you need to have all the major sects on board.
unfortunately the majority of the sunnis are behind Hariri Inc. pushing for a complete change now without them participating in it would leave them out, similar to the way the shi3a and majority of Christians are left out now. and that would not bring the country much stability.

the only solution? bring down the political sectarianism system. but we need all the major sects on board, unfortunatly.

Anonymous said...

Not bad Jojo
You are doing good.

vrai14mars said...

"genuinely disgruntled". How about me? How about you? How about those who didn't get a raise for years? How about those who got maimed by the criminal state of our roads? Does this mean that we should all proceed sinking the ship everybody is in? I'll tell you what: they are genuinely led like sheeps by criminals and fraudsters. They must either by naïve and profoundly stupid or find they have some short term personal interest in this mess. This is not to say that their sheer numbers doesn't give them credibility and an obvious right (if only because of their blackmail)in power sharing. I am with you: Down with Fatfat and Siniora and whoever you want but what's the plan for reform? What is supposed to come from those who did everything they could since May 17 1983 to bring disaster to this country (yes and Joumblatt and Hamade were their accomplices as long as it suited them)? We have to change big time but I don't see how Iran-financed and armed Hizbullah can do something for the future of this country's youth.

Hisham said...

Please explain to me how this whole "demonstration" doesn't represent the views of just ONE group in Lebanon. Oh I forgot, the Orangemen are voicing their opinion as well. What a load of crap!! How quickly we forget that Michel "the traitor" Aoun once fought the Syrians in attempt to drive them out in 1989. Now he's in their back pocket with his eyes on the presidency. You think he cares anymore about the Lebanese people than the current government which you label as stagnant and not giving a rat's ass about the people? You also fail to mention anything about the international tribunal and if stopping that process had any motivation for this demonstration. Please don't kid yourselves...as always, there are motives here that benefit our neighbors more than they benefit us. Oh, and it's not just the American press that refers to this group as pro-Syrian....it's everyone in the world except those sitting on their asses downtown right now wasting their time on a cause they know nothing about, driving the last nail in our economy's coffin. I guess as long as the arageel are lit and bayye3 el ka3k keeps coming around, no one's going anywhere. I wonder what the New Year's celebration is going to be like downtown. I heard Dick Clark is dissing Times Square for Martyrs Square. Afterall, it is for a noble and worthy cause...